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Eat Wisconsin Fish is sponsored by Wisconsin Sea Grant at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Wisconsin Sea Grant supports scientific research, education and outreach to foster the wise use, conservation and sustainable development of Great Lakes and coastal resources.

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Fish List

Eat Wisconsin Fish / Fish List

Great Lakes Fish

Burbot

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Most commercial fishers will readily agree that burbot is a little-known delicacy. Its firm, white flesh resembles that of cod and haddock, which should be no surprise since it is a member of the freshwater cod family. Learn more.

Chubs

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Bloater chubs have the highest amount of omega-3 fatty acids (EPA and DHA) of the Great Lakes commercial fish species—more than sockeye salmon. They are very oily, and they make a wonderful smoked fish. Learn more.

Lake Herring

Ciscoes have roughly the same amount of omega-3 fatty acids (EPA and DHA) as sockeye salmon. They can be used fresh, smoked and frozen; they can be steamed, fried, broiled and baked. Making ciscoes into fish cakes is a North Shore Scandinavian tradition. Learn more.

Lake Trout

Lake trout have roughly the same amount of omega-3 fatty acids (EPA and DHA) as sockeye salmon. The flesh of lake trout is firm, rich in flavor and white to red (often orange) in color. It is oily and is often enjoyed smoked. Learn more.

Lake Whitefish

Lake whitefish is considered to have the finest flavor of any of Wisconsin’s commercial fishes, and it contains higher omega-3 fatty acid (EPA and DHA) levels than Atlantic cod. Learn more.

Smelt

Smelt are oily, and their flesh has a soft texture. Their odor is like freshly cut cucumber. Lake smelt are considered less oily than saltwater smelt. Most smelt are headed and gutted, but people eat them with the bones intact. Learn more.

Walleye

The flesh of walleye is firm, white, fairly dry and virtually free of bones. Learn more.

Yellow Perch

Yellow perch, also known as lake perch, has a mild, sweet flavor with firm, flaky white flesh. It has slightly more omega-3 fatty acids (EPA and DHA) than Atlantic cod. Learn more.

Farm Raised Fish

Arctic Char

Arctic char has roughly the same amount of omega-3 fatty acids (EPA and DHA) as sockeye salmon. The taste of Arctic char falls somewhere between salmon and trout. Learn more.

Atlantic Salmon

Salmon is the second most-popular fish eaten in the United States. It tastes savory and earthy, yet slightly sweet, and is among the richest sources of omega-3 fatty acids. It is also full of high-quality protein, vitamins and minerals. Learn more.

Pacific White Shrimp

Many chefs prefer white shrimp because they have a clean, sweet taste with a classic shrimp flavor and firm texture. They are bluish-gray or greenish-gray when raw but turn pink when cooked. While all shrimp have more cholesterol than other types of seafood, they are lower in total and saturated fat than most meat and poultry. Learn more.

Rainbow Trout

The flesh of the rainbow trout is white, pink or orange in the raw state and lightens when cooked. It is a mild flavored fish with delicate small flakes and a nut-like flavor. Learn more.

Tilapia

Tilapia are flaky and mild-tasting. They are lean fish that have lower levels of omega-3 fatty acids than fattier fish species. Learn more.

Yellow Perch

Yellow perch, also known as lake perch, has a mild, sweet flavor with firm, flaky white flesh. It has slightly more omega-3 fatty acids (EPA and DHA) than Atlantic cod. Learn more.